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“The Twisted Ones” by T. Kingfisher

Many stories that fall under the “weird fiction” umbrella are set in either England or New England, but there seems to be a recent trend of placing such tales in Appalachia. Brian Hodge’s I’ll Bring You the Birds from Out of the Sky is set in West Virginia, and T. Kingfisher’s The Twisted Ones takes place in North Carolina. This is particularly interesting since Kingfisher’s novel is very directly and openly inspired by Arthur Machen’s The White People, which is set in Wales (where Machen himself grew up). At first glance, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of commonality between the two locales, but Kingfisher vividly evokes the lonely atmosphere of wild places to create a link.

Another bridge between the settings is their folklore. The British Isles gave rise to many tales about the Fair Folk, and modern authors like Susanna Clarke and Elizabeth Hand have mined this rich history to tell beautiful and unsettling stories. But Appalachia has its own traditions of haints and odd happenings, and many of the early European immigrants to the area came from the English/Scottish border regions. A blending of the two folk traditions is thus more natural than it might first appear, and indeed Alex Bledsoe’s Tufa novels make the connection explicit. Kingfisher posits that Cotgrave, the main character of the frame story in The White People, emigrated to North Carolina in an attempt to escape some dark knowledge or threat precipitated by his reading of the Green Book. That same mystery begins to reveal itself to his granddaughter when she arrives to clean out the house he and her grandmother shared after they have both died.

Kingfisher gives enough background on The White People that one doesn’t need to have read it to enjoy The Twisted Ones, but having done so does add to the story. She also avoids the biggest potential pitfall of writing a sequel of sorts to a horror or weird fiction story: that in elaborating on some mysterious occurrence, one can reveal too much and drain all the wonder/terror out of it. While Kingfisher does explain things that Machen only hinted at, and gives more details about the mechanics of the supernatural phenomena, parts of the story were still creepy enough to make me reluctant to turn off the lights when it was time to go to bed.

In addition to the main character, known as Mouse, The Twisted Ones presents several interesting side characters. Not the least of these is Mouse’s dog, Bongo. Some reviewers I’ve seen felt Bongo’s constant presence in the narrative was distracting, while others were happy that the novel stated at the beginning that Bongo survived the events of the book. I have to admit to some prejudice here; because Bongo’s personality reminded me very much of my mother-in-law’s recently-deceased dog, I found Bongo delightful and a bit poignant.

Kingfisher has a follow-up novel (it doesn’t seem to be a sequel, but is set in the same universe) called The Hollow Places due out later this year. If it’s anything like The Twisted Ones, I think I’ll enjoy reading it.

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