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“The Last Astronaut” by David Wellington

David Wellington, a veteran author of thrillers and monster horror novels, takes a detour into science fiction with his latest book, The Last Astronaut. When an interstellar object passing through the solar system shows unmistakable signs of being piloted by an alien intelligence, a moribund NASA scrambles a mission to make contact with it. Unfortunately, the only experienced astronaut they have available is living in disgrace and self-imposed exile after a catastrophic aborted mission to Mars.

Wellington is a master of maintaining tension. He conveys the sheer strangeness of the alien object very well, and makes the reader feel the crew’s growing sense of unease as they travel through its interior. On top of that, he layers interpersonal conflicts among the crew. They haven’t had as much time to get to know each other as the crew of a spacecraft normally would, and this really starts to take its toll as the mission goes on and the difficulties mount. Mutual distrust between the civilian and military personnel rears its head, as does the team’s skepticism that the main character has what it takes to lead the mission in light of her past.

While The Last Astronaut probably doesn’t quite meet the qualifications of hard sci-fi, Wellington does keep things relatively grounded. Some aspects of the extraterrestrials’ biology are implausible, but Wellington has clearly put some thought into how such organisms might function. Once the basic premise is accepted, the extrapolations from it are fairly reasonable. And as far as I can tell, the technology used by the human characters is plausible.

The book uses a framing device in which the narrative is meant to be the text of an in-world book written about the mission. Interspersed with the text are excerpts from voice recordings made by the crew members. While these didn’t pull me out of the story as I was reading, in retrospect I don’t think the format really added anything to the story. The information conveyed through the excerpts could have simply been presented as the characters’ thoughts, and the overall framing device didn’t feel necessary at all.

Ultimately, The Last Astronaut is a clever, engaging, page-turner of a novel. I’d be interested to see Wellington return to sci-fi in the future.

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